Team

 

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The IPI was designed in consultation with experts from the academic, biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and venture capital communities. The IPI is helmed by a Board of Directors representing all major stakeholder groups. The IPI has enlisted a world-class team of scientists as members of the Scientific Advisory Board, which will offer scientific guidance and oversight to ensure IPI resources are devoted to the most pressing challenges in protein research.

 

Leadership

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Timothy A. Springer, Ph.D. Founder; Board of Directors; Co-chair, Scientific Advisory Board Timothy A Springer, Ph.D. is the Latham Family Professor at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital. He is a world leader in structural biology and immunology. He is also a founder and private investor in biopharmaceutical ventures including LeukoSite, Scholar Rock, Morphic Therapeutic, Moderna Therapeutic, Editas Medicine, Selecta Biosciences, and Ab Initio Biotherapeutics. His research and company formation has led to six FDA-approved drugs, including antibodies for treating cancer and immune diseases.

Timothy A. Springer, Ph.D.

Founder; Board of Directors; Co-chair, Scientific Advisory Board

Timothy A Springer, Ph.D. is the Latham Family Professor at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital. He is a world leader in structural biology and immunology. He is also a founder and private investor in biopharmaceutical ventures including LeukoSite, Scholar Rock, Morphic Therapeutic, Moderna Therapeutic, Editas Medicine, Selecta Biosciences, and Ab Initio Biotherapeutics. His research and company formation has led to six FDA-approved drugs, including antibodies for treating cancer and immune diseases.

Andrew Kruse, Ph.D. Co-Founder; Co-chair, Scientific Advisory Board Andrew Kruse, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. His lab studies the molecular basis of membrane protein signaling important in human health and disease using biophysical techniques and structural biology. Andrew was selected for the 2016 Forbes “30 under 30” list, and is the recipient of notable awards including an NIH Director’s Early Independence Award and a Sloan Research Fellowship. He is a founder of Ab Initio Biotherapeutics.  

Andrew Kruse, Ph.D.

Co-Founder; Co-chair, Scientific Advisory Board

Andrew Kruse, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. His lab studies the molecular basis of membrane protein signaling important in human health and disease using biophysical techniques and structural biology. Andrew was selected for the 2016 Forbes “30 under 30” list, and is the recipient of notable awards including an NIH Director’s Early Independence Award and a Sloan Research Fellowship. He is a founder of Ab Initio Biotherapeutics.

 

Jeffrey Flier, M.D. Board of Directors Jeffrey Flier, M.D. is the Higginson Professor of Physiology and Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a leading authority in the molecular causes of obesity and diabetes. Dr. Flier served as the 21st Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at Harvard University, and he serves on the boards of several nonprofits including Brandeis University and companies including Scholar Rock.

Jeffrey Flier, M.D.

Board of Directors

Jeffrey Flier, M.D. is the Higginson Professor of Physiology and Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a leading authority in the molecular causes of obesity and diabetes. Dr. Flier served as the 21st Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at Harvard University, and he serves on the boards of several nonprofits including Brandeis University and companies including Scholar Rock.

 
 
Maykin Ho, Ph.D Board of Directors Maykin Ho, Ph.D retired as Partner of Goldman Sachs & Co. after 24 years, which included serving as Advisory Director of Global Healthcare Investment Banking and co-head of US Healthcare for Global Investment Research. She is a venture partner of Qiming Venture Partners and serves on the board of directors for Agios Pharmaceuticals, Parexel International, and the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center.

Maykin Ho, Ph.D

Board of Directors

Maykin Ho, Ph.D retired as Partner of Goldman Sachs & Co. after 24 years, which included serving as Advisory Director of Global Healthcare Investment Banking and co-head of US Healthcare for Global Investment Research. She is a venture partner of Qiming Venture Partners and serves on the board of directors for Agios Pharmaceuticals, Parexel International, and the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center.

Amir Nashat, Ph.D. Board of Directors Amir Nashat, Ph.D. is a Managing Partner at Polaris Partners and focuses on investments in healthcare. He currently represents Polaris as a Director of eight biotechnology startup companies and has served as a Director of seven others. He has been named to the Forbes Midas List of “Top 100 Venture Capitalists.”

Amir Nashat, Ph.D.

Board of Directors

Amir Nashat, Ph.D. is a Managing Partner at Polaris Partners and focuses on investments in healthcare. He currently represents Polaris as a Director of eight biotechnology startup companies and has served as a Director of seven others. He has been named to the Forbes Midas List of “Top 100 Venture Capitalists.”

Normand F. Smith Board of Directors Normand F. Smith is an attorney and partner at the firm Burns & Levinson, LLC. Normand has extensive experience in the areas of intellectual property, tax planning, and the formation and management of businesses in biotech. He has advised biotech entrepreneurs and scientists and served as general counsel to biotech companies. 

Normand F. Smith

Board of Directors

Normand F. Smith is an attorney and partner at the firm Burns & Levinson, LLC. Normand has extensive experience in the areas of intellectual property, tax planning, and the formation and management of businesses in biotech. He has advised biotech entrepreneurs and scientists and served as general counsel to biotech companies. 

 
 
K. Dane Wittrup, Ph.D. Board of Directors, Scientific Advisory Board K. Dane Wittrup, Ph.D. is the Carbon P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering and Biological Engineering at MIT, and is the Associate Director of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. Dr. Wittrup is responsible for most of the recent advances in directed evolution of biopharmaceutical proteins, including antibodies. He is a co-founder and CSO of Adimab and a co-founder and Scientific Advisory Board member of Eleven Biotherapeutics.

K. Dane Wittrup, Ph.D.

Board of Directors, Scientific Advisory Board

K. Dane Wittrup, Ph.D. is the Carbon P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering and Biological Engineering at MIT, and is the Associate Director of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. Dr. Wittrup is responsible for most of the recent advances in directed evolution of biopharmaceutical proteins, including antibodies. He is a co-founder and CSO of Adimab and a co-founder and Scientific Advisory Board member of Eleven Biotherapeutics.

 

Scientific Advisory Board

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Team

Leadership

Advisory Board

Careers

 

David Baker, Ph.D. is Professor of Biochemistry at University of Washington and Investigator of Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His research focuses on the prediction of macromolecular structures and functions. Dr. Baker has received numerous awards, including the AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize, the Sackler International Prize in Biophysics, the Overton Prize from the International Society of Computational Biology, and the Feynman Prize from the Foresight Institute. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Sciences.

David Baker, Ph.D. is Professor of Biochemistry at University of Washington and Investigator of Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His research focuses on the prediction of macromolecular structures and functions. Dr. Baker has received numerous awards, including the AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize, the Sackler International Prize in Biophysics, the Overton Prize from the International Society of Computational Biology, and the Feynman Prize from the Foresight Institute. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Sciences.

Stephen Blacklow, M.D., Ph.D is Gustavus Adolphus Pfeiffer Professor and Chair of the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School, and a member of the Department of Cancer Biology at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. His work on Notch1 receptor mutations found in human T cell acute lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma has led to the development of antibodies that suppress Notch signaling as drug candidates. Dr. Blacklow has been named a Pfizer Scholar, a Pew Scholar, and an Established Investigator of the American Heart Association.  

Stephen Blacklow, M.D., Ph.D is Gustavus Adolphus Pfeiffer Professor and Chair of the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School, and a member of the Department of Cancer Biology at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. His work on Notch1 receptor mutations found in human T cell acute lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma has led to the development of antibodies that suppress Notch signaling as drug candidates. Dr. Blacklow has been named a Pfizer Scholar, a Pew Scholar, and an Established Investigator of the American Heart Association.

 

Shuqi Chen, Ph.D. was the founder, CEO and Chairman of the Board of IQuum, Inc. Based on Dr.Chen's vision for next generation point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, he led IQuum to successfully develop the lab-in-a-tube technology platform and commercialize lab-quality POC molecular diagnostic products. In 2014, IQuum was acquired by Roche Molecular System, Inc., after which, Dr. Chen served as Vice President, Research and Development of Point of Care at Roche Molecular System.

Shuqi Chen, Ph.D. was the founder, CEO and Chairman of the Board of IQuum, Inc. Based on Dr.Chen's vision for next generation point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, he led IQuum to successfully develop the lab-in-a-tube technology platform and commercialize lab-quality POC molecular diagnostic products. In 2014, IQuum was acquired by Roche Molecular System, Inc., after which, Dr. Chen served as Vice President, Research and Development of Point of Care at Roche Molecular System.

 
 
Eric Fischer, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School and a Principal Investigator in the Department of Cancer Biology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. His research focuses on  understanding the complex mechanisms that underlie function and regulation of multi-component ubiquitin ligases and their role in disease. Dr. Fischer has been recognized for his pioneering work on the structure of cereblon and the mechanism of action of thalidomide.

Eric Fischer, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School and a Principal Investigator in the Department of Cancer Biology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. His research focuses on  understanding the complex mechanisms that underlie function and regulation of multi-component ubiquitin ligases and their role in disease. Dr. Fischer has been recognized for his pioneering work on the structure of cereblon and the mechanism of action of thalidomide.

K. Christopher Garcia, Ph.D. is Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and of Structural Biology at Stanford University School of Medicine and Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His lab has determined the crystal structures and signaling mechanisms of many receptor complexes critical to immunology, cancer immunotherapy, and regenerative medicine. In turn, the Garcia lab uses these structures as guides to engineer therapeutic protein candidates using techniques  that include yeast surface display. Dr. Garcia is an elected member of the National Academy of Science and the National Academy of Medicine.

K. Christopher Garcia, Ph.D. is Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and of Structural Biology at Stanford University School of Medicine and Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His lab has determined the crystal structures and signaling mechanisms of many receptor complexes critical to immunology, cancer immunotherapy, and regenerative medicine. In turn, the Garcia lab uses these structures as guides to engineer therapeutic protein candidates using techniques  that include yeast surface display. Dr. Garcia is an elected member of the National Academy of Science and the National Academy of Medicine.

Stephen Harrison, Ph.D. is Giovanni Armenise-Harvard Professor of Basic Medical Sciences, Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital, and Investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He has made important contributions to structural biology, most notably by determining and analyzing the structures of viruses and viral proteins, by crystallographic studies of protein/DNA complexes, by structural analysis of protein-kinase switching mechanisms, and by structural studies of subcellular assemblies such as kinetochores and clathrin coats. He directs the Harvard Center for Molecular and Cellular Dyanmics and the new Harvard cryoEM center.

Stephen Harrison, Ph.D. is Giovanni Armenise-Harvard Professor of Basic Medical Sciences, Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital, and Investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He has made important contributions to structural biology, most notably by determining and analyzing the structures of viruses and viral proteins, by crystallographic studies of protein/DNA complexes, by structural analysis of protein-kinase switching mechanisms, and by structural studies of subcellular assemblies such as kinetochores and clathrin coats. He directs the Harvard Center for Molecular and Cellular Dyanmics and the new Harvard cryoEM center.

 
 
John Hastewell, D. Phil. is Head of the NIBR Biologics Center (NBC) which is responsible for the discovery of antibody, protein and nucleic acid therapeutics. John has been with Novartis since 1989 and has experience in many areas of the company. He worked on drug absorption in the Advanced Drug Delivery Research group, Horsham, UK, before moving into drug discovery research, where he has worked on thrombosis, respiratory and immunology projects. Most recently, he was the Global Head of the Program Office for NIBR where he worked on NIBR’s research strategy and portfolio management including a critical role in the recent growth in NIBR’s biologics portfolio. His success there led to his taking his current role as the head of the NIBR Biologics Center.

John Hastewell, D. Phil. is Head of the NIBR Biologics Center (NBC) which is responsible for the discovery of antibody, protein and nucleic acid therapeutics. John has been with Novartis since 1989 and has experience in many areas of the company. He worked on drug absorption in the Advanced Drug Delivery Research group, Horsham, UK, before moving into drug discovery research, where he has worked on thrombosis, respiratory and immunology projects. Most recently, he was the Global Head of the Program Office for NIBR where he worked on NIBR’s research strategy and portfolio management including a critical role in the recent growth in NIBR’s biologics portfolio. His success there led to his taking his current role as the head of the NIBR Biologics Center.

Brian Kobilka, M.D. is Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, and Hélène Irwin Fagan Chair in Cardiology at Stanford University School of Medicine. The Kobilka lab focuses on the structure and mechanism of action of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which constitute the largest family of receptors for hormones and neurotransmitters in the human genome. GPCRs are the largest group of new therapeutic targets for many diseases. In 2012, Kobilka was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on GPCRs.  He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 

Brian Kobilka, M.D. is Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, and Hélène Irwin Fagan Chair in Cardiology at Stanford University School of Medicine. The Kobilka lab focuses on the structure and mechanism of action of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which constitute the largest family of receptors for hormones and neurotransmitters in the human genome. GPCRs are the largest group of new therapeutic targets for many diseases. In 2012, Kobilka was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on GPCRs.  He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 

Harvey F. Lodish, Ph.D. is Professor of Biology and of Biological Engineering at MIT and a foundering member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. His lab studies proteins and noncoding RNAs involved in formation of blood and fat cells and metabolism of glucose and fatty acids. His work has implications for treating anemias, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Lodish was a founder of Genzyme, Arris Pharmaceuticals, and Millennium Pharmaceuticals. He recently started Rubius with Flagship Ventures.

Harvey F. Lodish, Ph.D. is Professor of Biology and of Biological Engineering at MIT and a foundering member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. His lab studies proteins and noncoding RNAs involved in formation of blood and fat cells and metabolism of glucose and fatty acids. His work has implications for treating anemias, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Lodish was a founder of Genzyme, Arris Pharmaceuticals, and Millennium Pharmaceuticals. He recently started Rubius with Flagship Ventures.

 
 
Werner Meier is former Vice President of Biologics Drug Discovery at Biogen, Inc., where he guided the design, expression, characterization, and development transition of over two dozen novel protein therapeutics that included antibodies and their derivatives, receptor-Ig fusion proteins, and cytokines. Werner was also the Program Executive for two development programs aimed at treating immunologic and neurological diseases that successfully advanced from preclinical development through manufacturing into early clinical studies. He is currently Principal at Werner Meier Biologics LLC and a Scientific Advisory Board member of Applied BioMath.

Werner Meier is former Vice President of Biologics Drug Discovery at Biogen, Inc., where he guided the design, expression, characterization, and development transition of over two dozen novel protein therapeutics that included antibodies and their derivatives, receptor-Ig fusion proteins, and cytokines. Werner was also the Program Executive for two development programs aimed at treating immunologic and neurological diseases that successfully advanced from preclinical development through manufacturing into early clinical studies. He is currently Principal at Werner Meier Biologics LLC and a Scientific Advisory Board member of Applied BioMath.

Will Somers, Ph.D., joined Genetics Institute in 1994 to start a group that set up state-of-the-art automation and used X-ray structures for molecular design in many projects. At Wyeth, he led an expanded group that included molecular modeling and protein biochemistry. He now heads the Biomedicines Design group, which engages in discovery and development of antibodies, antibody drug conjugates, and endogenous proteins as biotherapeutics. Under Will’s leadership, the group uses structure-based engineering to improve the potency and manufacture of therapeutic leads, contributing to a diverse pipeline of biotherapeutics that have progressed to development.

Will Somers, Ph.D., joined Genetics Institute in 1994 to start a group that set up state-of-the-art automation and used X-ray structures for molecular design in many projects. At Wyeth, he led an expanded group that included molecular modeling and protein biochemistry. He now heads the Biomedicines Design group, which engages in discovery and development of antibodies, antibody drug conjugates, and endogenous proteins as biotherapeutics. Under Will’s leadership, the group uses structure-based engineering to improve the potency and manufacture of therapeutic leads, contributing to a diverse pipeline of biotherapeutics that have progressed to development.

Leonard I. Zon, M.D. is the Grousbeck Professor of Pediatric Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Investigator at Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and Director of the Stem Cell Program, Children’s Hospital Boston. Dr. Zon is known for his pioneering work on stem cells, cancer genetics, and in establishing zebrafish as a model for studying blood and hematopoietic development. Dr. Zon is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and has been awarded notable prizes including the E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize from the American Society of Hematology. He is a co-founder of Scholar Rock.

Leonard I. Zon, M.D. is the Grousbeck Professor of Pediatric Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Investigator at Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and Director of the Stem Cell Program, Children’s Hospital Boston. Dr. Zon is known for his pioneering work on stem cells, cancer genetics, and in establishing zebrafish as a model for studying blood and hematopoietic development. Dr. Zon is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and has been awarded notable prizes including the E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize from the American Society of Hematology. He is a co-founder of Scholar Rock.

 

Careers

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